The Bankwatch

Tracking the consumer evolution of financial services

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The true meaning of innovation in financial services lies in the plumbing, not UI


This piece on internet and evolution of financial services has the best quote I have seen for some time.

“these companies have merely built nice UI’s to Wall Street”

How To Disrupt Wall Street | The Business Insider

As I see it, these companies have merely built nice UI’s to Wall Street: Mint connects to your banks and Square to Visa and Mastercard and the bank that issued the credit card. If people at farmers’ markets use credit cards instead of cash, that means more money for Wall Street, not less.

Brilliant. I take no issue with the likes of Mint, and Square which are nice new innovations. which may well result in big changes later. However they are hardly game changing today. Game changing would mean that in 20 years time we might see future headlines such as:

  • Headlines – 2030
  • bank branches are no longer ….
  • banks have largely been replaced by ….
  • customers obtain financial services today from ….
  • Hedge funds have replaced …..
  • A new type of investment fund has …..

In order for such headlines to appear new sets of new companies will be needed, but more importantly companies that are based on dramatic shifts and simplicity in how money moves around. Money moves today amongst people and banks in a certain way today. This is the plumbing of banking. Payments networks, clearing systems and ATM networks are how money moves around. Mint for example does nothing to change that. In fact arguably Mint makes banks stronger by providing new reasons to stay with the current bank because the functionality Mint offers is based on access to existing plumbing.

The financial systems that comprise the plumbing and the operators who sit over the plumbing such as Banks, aggregators (eg Yodlee, Cashedge), Card companies (eg Visa, MasterCard), all serve to actually increase the complexity and also the probably, the cost of moving money around. More players means more competition, and it also means more aggregate costs in the system. For consumers they must beware new sets of fees which in total increase the overall costs of their financial services.

Let us not forget that one of the causes of the financial crisis of 2008 was the lack of transparency embedded in the financial products that served the securitization markets. Those markets remain, and the methodologies have yet to be re-invented. Government regulation will not fix that problem.

For me true innovation will only occur when plumbing changes. Despite the recession the world is awash in cash, seeking better returns, yet the ‘system’ generates very very low real returns on cash investments when compared to the interest rates which are paid by people on loans, credit cards and to a lessor extent mortgages. The interest rate differential between that paid, and that earned is being eaten up by more and more players. This has resulted in a shift to more and more fees because the interest spreads just don’t offer enough return to fund the ‘system’. This is a snowball effect that can never be good for people. Forget about bank bonuses. Those are asymptomatic of an inefficient system that is driven by driving people harder and paying them with large bonuses to make an inefficient system work by creating ways to hide the inefficiency – lipstick on a pig. Bonuses are just one element of cost in an inefficient system.

Thus true innovation can only occur when we see elements of plumbing removed, costs removed, and money able to move between people with less steps and costs thus eliminated. Included in the plumbing are banks and their systems, payment networks and their systems, card providers and their systems, and unfortunately this includes the new UI providers referred to in the article above.

When we see players changing plumbing such that existing systems are bypassed, and made no longer relevant to a transaction, we will have innovation. When that happens players will change and eventually be eliminated, and those headlines may begin to appear.

Written by Colin Henderson

January 23, 2010 at 20:18

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